Why the greyhound ships may have been sunk

When the greyhounds went missing from the Greyhound Shipping line in New York in July 2016, the New York Times reported that the ships were being repaired to make them fit for duty.

But as soon as the vessels returned to port, the vessels were found to have been scrapped.

The shipyards said that they had never heard of the grey hounds being scrapped.

Now, a study by the New England Maritime Museum (NEMM) has shown that greyhound companies and their suppliers, including Norfolk-based S.L.B. Engineering and Oceanic Services (SLES), did not tell their customers they were being scrapped at the time, and the company was not aware of their salvage value.

“The company was unaware that the vessels had been scrapped at all, so that was a huge surprise to them,” said the museum’s head of maritime conservation, James Tull.

Tull, who is also the co-author of a report on the Greyhounds’ disappearance, said the company’s involvement with the ships’ scrapping was not only negligent, but unethical.

The study, which is being published by the museum on Wednesday, found that SLES was involved in the salvage of the vessels between April and August 2017.

The NEMM’s research also found that the Grey Hound Shipping Company, which has been operating in the US since 1985, did not know about the salvage at the ships. “

SLes did not disclose the salvage information to the owners of the GreyHounds before the salvage took place.”

The NEMM’s research also found that the Grey Hound Shipping Company, which has been operating in the US since 1985, did not know about the salvage at the ships.

The company, which had not responded to a request for comment, had no immediate comment.

The NEOMM study also revealed that SLESS’s owners had not informed the company of their plan to scrap the Grey Hounds, or about the potential salvage value for the vessels.

It also found the company had failed to communicate to customers that they were going to scrap their Grey Hound Ships.

The report also found SLES and SLES’ own documents to be “unreliable” and said it was not clear why the companies were not informed about the scrapping before the vessels’ scrappage took place.

“We have been trying to get to the bottom of this issue for a long time, but this has been an ongoing issue for us,” Tull said.

“Our main concern is that people who were actually buying GreyHound ships may not have known that the shipyards had been involved in this and they may not be aware that the salvage had taken place.”

Tull also said the fact that the scrap was not immediately advertised by the Greyhorse Shipping Company was “an indication that there was something else going on”.

“It’s not uncommon for the Grey Horses to be sold at auction, but we are trying to understand why they were not put on display,” he said.